ECET 365 Embedded Microprocessor System DeVry

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ECET 365 Embedded Microprocessor System DeVry

Just Click on Below Link To Download This Course:

https://www.coursetutor.us/product/ecet-365-embedded-microprocessor-system-devry/

 

 

ECET 365 Embedded Microprocessor System DeVry

ECET 365 Week 1 Motor Control DeVry

ECET 365 Week 1 Discussions

WEEK 1: PWM AND DC MOTORS

What are the advantages of using PWM to run a motor slowly compared to using a low DC voltage?

WEEK 1: USING AN H-BRIDGE

How does an H-bridge control the current going to the motor?

ECET 365 Week 1 HOMEWORK

Complete the following Homework in your text: Pages 454–455, Problems 8.9, 8.10, D8.13, D8.14, D8.15. Please write all of your answers in Word.

Don’t forget to submit your assignment.

 

ECET 365 Week 1 COURSE PROJECT (DUE IN WEEK 8)

Review the Course Project Overview under the Introduction & Resources area for an overall description of the Course Project, grading rubric, and deliverables.

In addition to doing Lab 1, it is highly recommended to read the Construction Notes for the Robotic Car, found in the Files section of the Course Menu.

 

ECET 365 Week 1 Lab

Lab 1: Programming for Stepper Motors, DC Motors, and Servos Using an H-bridge

Objectives

  1. Develop software routines that control Stepper Motors, small permanent magnet DC motors, and Servos.
  2. Understand how an H-bridge can be used to control DC motors and Stepper Motors.

Parts List

  1. Smart Car Kit or Other Provided Kit (e.g. robotics kit, supplementary parts kit)
  2. Freescale Tower Kit with S12G128 CPU board or Other Provided CPU Board
  3. PC with IDE software (e.g. CodeWarrior Development Studio V5.1)

Introduction

  1. DC motors are used in the Smart Car Kit. Also used are a servo and H-Bridge. Stepper motors may be used in the Robotics Kit. The Supplementary Parts Kit may have a stepper motor.
  2. This lab explores the techniques used to interface to these devices and also how to program and control them.

 

Deliverables

Answer all questions in Week 1 Lab Cover Sheet here (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site..

Submit your Week 1 Lab Assignment.

You can also download the cover sheet for Week 1 Lab in the Files section of the Course Menu.

Required Software

CodeWarrior Development Studio for S12(x) V5.1

Access the software at http://www.nxp.com/ (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site..

Lab Steps

STEP 1: Procedures

  1. Determine if your motor is a DC motor or a stepper motor. (Hint: DC motors are powered with two wires. Stepper motors may have four or more wires. DC motors will begin running when DC voltage is applied. Stepper motors will not run unless several pulse trains are applied. Go to the appropriate procedures below.
  2. Procedures for DC Motors
    1. Develop an interface from the CPU board to the motor.
      1. Choose a Port on the CPU board. Only one bit is required. If an H-bridge is available, connect the appropriate bit from the chosen Port to the appropriate input to the H-bridge. The double H-bridges that come with the Smart Car Kit require 4 input bits. Consult the Week 2 Lecture for ways to operate the H-bridge.
      2. If you don’t have an H-bridge, you may have to use a transistor, relay, or optical isolator to build an interface between the Port and the device. Your reading assignment in the suggested reference textbook offers many suggestions. Also, see the Week 2 Lecture.
    2. Controlling speed with program loop
      1. Start by turning the motor on by sending the appropriate byte to the Port, using a short C program.
      2. Send the appropriate byte to the Port to turn the motor off.
      3. You can now turn the motor on or off by changing the byte value in the program, recompiling, and loading the program into the CPU board.
      4. Now, however, we want to control the speed of the motor by changing the width of the bit at Port C. Do this by adding a delay program that keeps the pulse on for a 50% duty cycle. Let the period of the pulse be 200 microseconds, giving a frequency of 5 kHz. Use an endless loop in the program.
      5. Experiment with pulse widths of 25% and 75%. Note that the speed varies with the pulse width.
    3. Controlling speed with PWM registers
      1. See Week 2 Lecture for example of PWM programs that produce a pulse train with 50% duty cycle and pulse frequency of 7.7 kHz. This pulse train provided a medium speed for the Smart Car. Note that the pin PWM0 (Channel 0) is located on the Axiom S12G128 CPU board primary side pin A40.
      2. The PWMDTY0 command controls the width of the pulse.
      3. Notice that the sequence of PMW commands keeps the signal going to the PMW0 pin automatically, while the rest of the program can be doing something else. The PMW pin is connected to one H-bridge digital input.
    1. Using the H-bridge
      1. You might need to use the H-bridge to control the battery voltage to the motors. If you have a two-motor system, each motor is connected to one of the rear wheels. An H-Bridge can be used to feed the digital PWM pulse inputs to an output that is connected to the higher voltage motor system. For example, a 12-volt supply may be used by the motor, while the rest of the electronic modules might use 3.3V or 5V.
      2. In a simple Smart Car with one motor, the operator only needs one digital input that the CPU board can turn on and off. The other inputs can be hardwired to 5V or ground as appropriate.
    1. Download the Week 1 Lab Cover Sheet here and answer the questions for Step 1: Procedure.

STEP 2: Stepper Motor Procedures

ACTIVITY 1:
Examine the “Using H-Bridge to Drive Stepper Motor” in website below:

http://www.microdigitaled.com/HCS12/Hardware/Dragon12-Plus-Support.htm (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.

  1. Use an ohmmeter to measure the resistance of leads. This should identify the COM leads A through D winding leads.
  2. The common wires are connected to the positive side of the power supply. In many motors, +5V is sufficient. DO NOT USE +5V POWER FROM DRAGON12 PLUS BOARD. Make sure to use an external power supply.

ACTIVITY 2:
After making sure that Activity 1 works, write and run the following:

Connect a switch to PORTH and use it for clockwise or counter clockwise. Use PORTH1=0 for CW and PORTH=1 for CCW.

ACTIVITY 3:
Use two more bits of PTH (such as PORTH7 and PORTH6) DIP switches to choose the degree of rotation as shown below:

PORTH7 PORTH6  
0 0 90 degrees
0 1 180
1 0 270
1 1 360

 

STEP 3: Procedures for Interfacing to the Servo

  1. Refer to the Smart Car Instruction Manual in the Files section of the Course Menu section of the course shell.
  2. Produce a logic pulse train with a period of about 20 milliseconds. A signal generator may be suitable. You can also write a loop program.
  3. The width of the pulse determines the position of the servo. A 0.5-millisecond pulse rotates the servo fully clockwise (about 45 degrees from the center of movement.  A 1.5-millisecond pulse rotates the servo to the opposite end of rotation. A 1.0 millisecond pulse puts the servo at the center of rotation. DO NOT SEND PULSES WIDER THAN 2 MILLISECONDS.
  4. Write a small C program that controls the Servo by providing a pulse train with controlled pulse widths. This routine will later be used to control the steering (using the servo) with an input number derived from the linear video array. See the Program Listing in Appendix A of the Smart Car Construction Manual.
  5. Complete questions for Step 3 in the Week 1 Lab Cover Sheet.

 

ECET 365 Week 1 Quiz

Instructions

Welcome to Week 1 Quiz.

  • This quiz covers CO 3 and Chapter 8.
  • This quiz is worth 20 total points, which include the following questions:
    • 3 multiple-choice questions at 5 points each; and
    • 1 short-answer question at 5 points each.
  • You have 60 minutes to finish the quiz.
  • Here is a reminder to SAVE frequently, because when the time limit is reached you will be exited from the exam.
  • This quiz contains one page.

By submitting this work, I am attesting that it abides by the Student Honor Code.

ECET 365 Week 2 Interfacing with Sensors and Subsystems DeVry

ECET 365 Week 2 Discussions

WEEK 2: COMPARISON OF COMMUNICATIONS PROTOCOLS

What are the advantages and disadvantages of the different communications protocols introduced in this week?

WEEK 2: PROTOCOLS USED IN THE PROJECT

Which protocols are required by the subsystems in the project?

ECET 365 Week 2 HOMEWORK

Complete the following Homework in your text:

Pages 384 – 387, Problems 7.1, 7.4, 7.9, 7.13, D7.17.

Page 639, Problems 12.1 – 12.5.

Don’t forget to submit your assignment.

 

ECET 365 Week 2 COURSE PROJECT (DUE IN WEEK 8)

Review the Course Project Overview under the Introduction & Resources area for an overall description of the Course Project, grading rubric, and deliverables.

In addition to doing Lab 2, it is highly recommended to read the Construction Notes for the Smart Car that pertain to the Visual Sensor, found in the Files section of the Course Menu.

 

ECET 365 Week 2 Lab

Lab 2: Interfacing to the Smart Car Video Sensor

Objectives

  1. Develop a hardware interface to the visual sensor in the Robotic Car Kit.
  2. Test the sensor with software and use data to control the steering servo.

Parts List

  1. Robotic Car Kit with visual sensors
  2. Freescale Tower Kit with S12G128 CPU board
  3. PC with IDE software (e.g. CodeWarrior Development Studio V5.1)

Introduction

  1. The Robotic Car is required to follow a one-inch-wide centerline around a track. In the actual contests, various track configurations could be encountered. Here, we use an oval track made with sheets of white foam board and 1-inch-wide black cloth Gorilla Tape (labeled “Not Electrical Tape).
  2. The visual sensor system is provided in the Robotic Car Kit to follow the center line. The scheme is to use two sensors, one on each edge of the center track. The sensors are infrared sensors. There are also two infrared LEDs that illuminate the area of the track seen by the sensors. Each sensor detects the infrared energy that is reflected from the track surface. When the Robotic Car is centered on the centerline, both sensors see almost no infrared light reflected from the black surface. However, if one of the sensors strays onto the white background (the foam board), the infrared light is greatly reflected and the sensors alert the CPU that the car has moved too far left or right.

 

Deliverables

Answer all questions in Week 2 Lab Cover Sheet here (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site..

Submit your Week 2 Lab Assignment.

You can also download the cover sheet for Week 2 Lab in the Files section of the Course Menu.

Required Software

CodeWarrior Development Studio for S12(x) V5.1

Access the software at http://www.nxp.com/ (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site..

Lab Steps

STEP 1: Procedures

  1. Construct Interface between Visual Sensors and CPU Board
    1. The PmodLS1 Infrared Light Detector Module Reference Manual (in the Files section of the Course Menu) describes the module that is the interface between the CPU Board and the Visual Sensors.  Examine the photographs in Appendix B of the Construction Notes for the Robotic Car and observe that the module is soldered to the proto-board via the 6-pin header strip.  The pins need to be bent down (carefully) at a 45 degree angle so that the module is slanted upward.  The cables from the sensor modules (attached to the front bumper via Velcro supplied in the Robotic Car Kit) are connected to the module.  Note the color coded wires correspond to the markings on the module.  This project uses S3 and S4.  The module includes LEDS to show the functioning of the outputs of the sensors.  An LED which is on means that a logical 1 is on the output pins.  See Figure 3 showing the orientation of the sensors on the bumper.
  1. Testing the Video SensorsIt is recommended to operate the sensors from the +3.3V power on the proto-board.  This power comes from the power supply at the bottom of the primary elevator of the Tower.  The power supply has two screw terminals for +5V input and Ground.  You should use the battery holder (4 AA cells), but make sure the total battery voltage is less than 5.5 volts.  If you run the sensors from +5 V directly, you will put more than 20 mA through the LEDs, possibly damaging them.

In place of an actual track, we can use an index card with a center stripe that is black and 1inch wide.  See Photos 1 and 2 in Appendix B.  Black GorillaTMTape is recommended, but you could use a black felt marker.  Make sure the color is uniform.

  1. The PmodLS1 module contains a small potentiometer that can be adjusted with a small flat bladed screwdriver approximately 0.070 inches in width.  We want to adjust the potentiometer so that the LEDs on the module (LD3 and LD4) are off when the center strip is along the center axis of the car.  As the strip is moved to one side, one LED will light up as the sensor sees the white background of the index card.  The other LED will light up when the card is moved to the other side.

Both LEDs will light up if both sensors see the white background, which indicates that the car has left the center track entirely.

  1. The right sensor output (LD4) is connected to Primary side pin A47.  The left sensor output (LD3) is connected to Primary side pin A48. These pins are accessible from the proto-board.  The connecting wires can be soldered to the holes from either the top or bottom of the proto-board.

Pin A47 is the input to Port A (A0).  Pin A48 is the input to Port A (A1 ).  By examining the Robotic Car programs in Appendix A, you can see how the sensor inputs are used for the steering logic.

  1. The program stops the right wheel if the left sensor sees the white background. Similarly, the left wheel is stopped if the right sensor sees the white background. In either case, the result is that the wheel which is still turning moves the sensor back onto the black stripe.

If both sensors light up, it means that the car has gone off the black stripe completely, and both motors stop.

When all motor and sensor connections and the power wiring is complete, we can load the first program and test the steering system.  We will do this in the next task.

    1. Set the car on a block (firm packing foam works) so that the wheels can turn without interference.  Ensure that the batteries are installed.
    2. The TWR-S12G128 CPU board and the proto-board should be installed in the Tower.  Make sure the primary edges of the boards are installed on the primary elevator of the Tower.  The boards can be installed backwards but they will not work.
    3. Consult the TWR-S12G128_UG.pdf User Guide.   The Power section shows that the Power Select jumper (JP5) should be set to pins 3 and 4, the default setting.  This is necessary for the PC to program the CPU board.
    4. Turn on SW1.  The +5V LED and +3.5V LED at the bottom of each elevator should light up.  Also, a green LED on the CPU board will light up.
    5. Using a PC with the CodeWarrior V5.1 installed, connect the USB cable between the PC and the CPU board.  More LEDs will light up on the CPU board.  See the “Connecting the Robotic Car to CodeWarrior” document in the Files section of the Course Menu.
    6. Once the program is running, you can remove the USB cable from the CPU board.  The program will shut down when you shut down the power to the CPU board, but it will resume when the power is again applied.
    7. Center the striped index card under the Visual Sensors and ensure that both sensors are over the black stripe.  Turn on SW2 and SW3.  Both wheels should be rotating.
    8. Move the card to the right side.  When the left sensor reaches the white background, the wheel on the right side should stop.
    9. Move the card to the left side.  As the sensors go over the black stripe, both wheels will rotate.   When the right sensor reaches the white background, the left wheel will stop.
    10. This completes the testing of the Robotic Car.
  1. Observations – Complete the following questions in the Week 2 Lab Cover Sheet and submit your Lab assignment.
    1. Sketch the change in the output of the visual sensors as the striped index card is moved from the center to each side of the center line.
    2. Describe the effect of the potentiometer on the output of the sensor module.
    3. If the motors and software are installed, describe the action of the drive wheels as the index card is moved left and right.

ECET 365 Week 2 Quiz

Instructions

Here is some information about your Quiz.

  • This quiz covers CO 4 and Chapters 7, 11, and 12.
  • This quiz is worth 20 total points, which include the following questions:
    • 3 multiple-choice questions at 5 points each;
    • 1 short-answer question at 5 points each; and
  • You have 60 minutes to finish the quiz.
  • Here is a reminder to SAVE frequently, because when the time limit is reached, you will automatically be exited from the exam.
  • This quiz contains one page.

By submitting this work, I am attesting that it abides by the Student Honor Code.

ECET 365 Week 3 Software and Hardware Subsystems DeVry

ECET 365 Week 3 Discussions

WEEK 3: FINITE STATE MACHINE MODULES VS. PROCEDURAL CODE

What are the advantages and disadvantages of a Finite State Machine model compared to a Procedural model?

WEEK 3: SOFTWARE MODULES FOR THE PROJECT

What software modules are suggested for the current project?

ECET 365 Week 3 HOMEWORK

Pages 146—147, Problems 2.18, 2.19, 2.20, D2.23, D2.24.

Don’t forget to submit your assignment.

 

ECET 365 Week 3 COURSE PROJECT (DUE IN WEEK 8)

Review the Course Project Overview under the Introduction & Resources area for an overall description of the Course Project, grading rubric, and deliverables.

The Lab this week requires the students to develop a set of subsystems that will fulfill a given set of requirements for the Robotic Car. These requirements can be found in the Files section of the Course Menu.

 

ECET 365 Week 3 Lab

Lab 3: Converting Requirements to a Work Schedule

Objectives

  1. Develop a map showing which hardware subsystems from the kit will be used to meet each requirement. Determine if additional parts are required.
  2. Determine which hardware subsystems will require software support to control the subsystems or provide communications between subsystems.
  3. Produce a set of tasks needed to meet the requirements. Assign tasks to team members.
  4. Develop a work schedule for a presentation to the class. Include serial and parallel scheduling of tasks to meet the time requirements.

Parts List

  1. Robotics Car Kit or Other Provided Kit
  2. Freescale Tower Kit with S12G128 CPU board or Other Provided CPU Board
  3. PC with IDE software (e.g. CodeWarrior Development Studio V5.1)
  4. Scheduling software (e.g. Microsoft Project)

Introduction

  1. The purpose of this course is to prepare you for the Senior Project. If you think this course is intense, consider that, in the Senior Project, you will not be given a kit to build. You will have to determine what you will build. In this course, the kit will be determined, although you may find that additional materials are required.
  2. You will also be given a set of requirements for this course. In the Senior Project, you will develop your own requirements. This course will give you an idea of how requirements are met.
  3. You will also learn how to develop a work schedule for a project. This knowledge will serve you well in the Senior Project.
  4. Finally, you will learn how to develop techniques to build the system so that you have a test plan that can be used to troubleshoot should any malfunctions occur. It is rare when nothing fails. Having a test plan will greatly maintain your sanity as the project deadline approaches.
  5. The lab for this week consists of mapping the hardware subsystems to the requirements, determining what software modules are required to support the subsystems, assigning work tasks to team members, and producing a work schedule that will be presented to the class at the end of the week.

Deliverables

Answer all questions in Week 3 Lab Cover Sheet here (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site..

Submit your Week 3 Lab Assignment.

You can also download the cover sheet for Week 3 Lab in the Files section of the Course Menu.

Required Software

CodeWarrior Development Studio for S12(x) V5.1

Access the software at http://www.nxp.com/ (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site..

Lab Steps

STEP 1: Procedures

  1. Determine the project requirements.
    1. Read the ECET365 Smart Car Contest Rules in the Files section of the Course Menu.
    2. For each relevant item in the Rules, determine what subsystems are required to meet the requirement. For example, the following items may be relevant:
      1. The Robotic Car must follow a 1-inch-wide black stripe down the middle of the track.
      2. The track curves will have a bending radius not less than 500 mm.  Therefore, the Robotic Car must be able to follow a curve of 500mm radius.
      3. The track width will be at least 600 mm, so the Smart Car must stay on the track, even as it goes around the curves.
      4. The Robotic Car must go around the track twice.
      5. The Robotic Car must stop within 3 meters after completing two laps.
      6. The fastest Robotic Car wins. The time is the fastest lap time for either of the two laps.
      7. The Robotic Car is autonomous. It is not controlled by an external driver or computer.

There may be other requirements hidden in the rules, especially about the type and number of microprocessors allowed.

  1. Determine alternative subsystems to meet the requirements.
    1. Create a table of requirements and alternative subsystems. A brief example is shown below:
Table 1
Requirement Alternative 1 Alternative 2 Alternative 3
Follow centerline on track Linear array subsystem Webcam subsystem Photodiode subsystem
Make two laps, then stop at finish line Counter/timer subsystem Video/counter subsystem Voltage monitor subsystem
  1. You may not need as many as three alternatives, or you may find that you can think of more alternatives. Use the “brain-storming” technique at this point, which means that no idea is discounted. At least, it is not discounted yet.
  1. Determine a set of alternatives for the actual plan.  Note that there are different possible sets of alternatives, but some will come together because of their similarities and use of common resources. Consider the following:
    1. Time and expense to use the alternative. If the kit contains a module, that may save expense, but buying something else may save you time.
    2. Ordering items can be more expensive for overnight delivery, or it may cost you time to choose less expensive shipping.
    3. Using items with a common voltage requirement may save you development time and expense. Otherwise, you may need multiple power supplies.
    4. Capability of team members. Some members may be skilled at certain circuit building, sensor, or motor control techniques. This might lead you to choose an alternative.
  2. Prepare a work schedule.
    1. This is the part of the process that uses the most guesswork. You must estimate the amount of time required to assemble each subsystem, test it, connect the subsystems, test them, assemble the final prototype, and test it. Note that some subsystems require both hardware and software to be developed.
    2. You need to decide the order in which the subsystems will be developed and which tasks can be performed in parallel. Consult the Outline of Smart Car Project in the Files section of the Course Menu. It gives a rough idea of how much time each task requires, but it does not show you which tasks could be done with more people.
    3. You need to assign people to the tasks and responsibilities to the team members.  Microsoft Project is suitable for building the work schedule, but of course, there are alternatives.
  1. Observations – Complete the following questions in the Week 3 Lab Cover Sheet and submit your Lab assignment.
    1. The class may have suggestions for improving your work schedule.
    2. You may find ideas from other schedules.
    3. A sanity test is best done by others outside your team.

ECET 365 Week 3 Quiz

Instructions

Here is some information about your Quiz.

  • This quiz covers COs 1, 2 and Chapters 1, 2.
  • This quiz is worth 20 total points, which include the following questions:
    • 3 multiple-choice questions at 5 points each;
    • 1 short-answer question at 5 points each; and
  • You have 60 minutes to finish the quiz.
  • Here is a reminder to SAVE frequently, because when the time limit is reached, you will automatically be exited from the exam.
  • This quiz contains one page.

By submitting this work, I am attesting that it abides by the Student Honor Code.

ECET 365 Week 4 Power Systems DeVry

ECET 365 Week 4 Discussions

WEEK 4: ALTERNATE BATTERY TYPES

What are the advantages and disadvantages of using NICAD, NIMH, lithium, or sealed lead-acid rechargeable batteries?

WEEK 4: SUBSYSTEM POWER REQUIREMENTS

Compare the power requirements for the subsystems of your project to the power requirements for the motors.

ECET 365 Week 4 HOMEWORK

Page 242, Problem 4.10. Page 586, Problem 11.5c,g. Page 589, D11.20, D11.21

Don’t forget to submit your assignment.

 

ECET 365 Week 4 COURSE PROJECT (DUE IN WEEK 8)

Review the Course Project Overview under the Introduction & Resources area for an overall description of the Course Project, grading rubric, and deliverables.

The Lab is focused on tasks required to develop a power supply system for the project.

 

ECET 365 Week 4 Lab

Lab 4: Converting Requirements to a Work Schedule

Objectives

  1. Test the main power supply of the Smart Car or robotic system.
  2. Test the subsystem power supplies and determine if a separate battery system is required for the subsystems.

Parts List

  1. Robotic Car Kit
  2. Freescale Tower Kit with S12G128 CPU board
  3. PC with IDE software (e.g. CodeWarrior Development Studio V5.1)
  4. Alternative Robotics Kit or other kit if applicable

Introduction

  1. A project system contains several subsystems that require power. The Robotic Car Kit, for example, has a visual sensor subsystem, a steering subsystem, a CPU board subsystem, and a motor control subsystem. It may be possible to run the subsystems from one main power supply (e.g. a 9V or 12V rechargeable battery). Warning: DO NOT POWER DC MOTORS USING THE POWER FROM THE DRAGON BOARD OR POWER BOARD. USE A SEPARATE POWER SUPPLY.
  2. The Robotic Car uses 4 AA batteries. The power supply on the Primary elevator board accepts a 5 V input to produce 3.3V for the Tower. Four new alkaline AA batteries have a starting voltage of 1.61 X 4 = 6.44 V.  This is a bit too much for the power supply. The power supply was tested at this voltage for a short time, but the current drain was 100 ma.  The current drain was much less, as the voltage input approaches 5 V.

A rechargeable NiMH battery has a peak voltage of 1.35 V. This gives a total voltage of 1.35 x 4 = 5.4V. This is much better. If you don’t see the wisdom of rechargeable batteries, you could drain the non-rechargeable batteries using a resistor (greater than 10 ohms) until the voltage is 1.35 V.

  1. It is also possible that the subsystems might require a separate battery system to avoid interference from the large motor pulses powered by the main power system.
  2. This lab will evaluate the power provided to the subsystems to determine if a separate battery is needed.
  3. Similar procedures would be used for a robotics project with subsystems.

Deliverables

Answer all questions in Week 4 Lab Cover Sheet here (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site..

Submit your Week 4 Lab Assignment.

You can also download the cover sheet for Week 4 Lab in the Files section of the Course Menu.

Required Software

CodeWarrior Development Studio for S12(x) V5.1

Access the software at http://www.nxp.com/ (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site..

Lab Steps

STEP 1: Procedures

  1. Robotic Car Subsystems
    1. The interacting subsystems are the visual sensor subsystem, the steering subsystem, the motor subsystem, and the CPU board subsystem. We need to ensure that the motor subsystem does not affect the other systems.
    2. Set the assembled car on blocks so that the motor wheels can move freely. Consider that the front wheels must have room to move.
    3. Load the Robotic Car program into the CPU board. Ensure that the visual sensor inputs and outputs are connected to the CPU board.  Also, ensure that the H-Bridge inputs are correctly connected.
    4. In a previous lab, we have tested the steering of the front wheels with an index card that has a 1-inch-wide stripe down the center of the card. This time, we will test the system with the wheels powered.
    5. Test the system with the subsystems powered, but the motor power to the H-bridge disconnected. Single-pole single-throw switches are recommended, but you can just disconnect the appropriate wires.  Troubleshoot the system if it does not operate satisfactorily. Once the visual system works correctly, proceed to the next step.

Note: These procedure steps can be performed whether the Tower system has been mounted on the Robotic Car chassis or not. It is recommended that the Tower be mounted on the chassis. Otherwise, the system is a confusing pile of wires. Nevertheless, it can be tested in such a manner. See the Robotic Construction Notes in the Files section of the Course Menu.

    1. Again, test the steering system, but turn the motor power on. The H-bridge is sending large pulses to the motor. If the subsystems are connected to the same battery as the motor power subsystem, the motor pulses may interfere with the steering subsystems. The Robotic steering works by stopping the motor on one side when the sensor on the other side detects the white background of the foam board track.
    2. If there is no interference, proceed to step 8.  If there is interference such that the steering is not working correctly, use the oscilloscope to observe the power going to the subsystems. First, try the power going to the CPU board. The power supply on the Tower primary elevator provides the 3.3V to the protoboard and CPU board. Check the 3.3V bus for interference.

It may be that a few more capacitors on the subsystem power lines may reduce the noise enough for the steering to work correctly. Note that you can add filter capacitors (tens of microfarads) before and after the voltage regulators. Consider the filter shown in the Robotic Construction Notes (see the Files section of the Course Menu).

If not, you may consider a separate battery for the subsystems.  The batteries are heavier than the capacitors.  If a separate battery does not work, go back to step 5 and verify that the system works without the motor running.  If running the motor with separate batteries for motor and subsystem, check for wiring and connection errors.  Again, the oscilloscope is very useful for tracking noise pulses.  When you have a correctly working system, proceed to step 8.

    1. If the steering works correctly with the motor running, and you haven’t done so already, mount the tower system on the Smart Car chassis. See the Robotic Construction Notes document in the Files section of the Course Menu.
    2. Observations
      1. For each subsystem, determine the actual current draw. If a sensitive ammeter is not available, use a small (0.1 or 1 ohm) resistor in series with the power lead. Measure the voltage across the resistor and calculate the current using Ohm’s Law (I = V/R).
        1. Video sensor  _____
        2. Servo              _____
        3. CPU board     _____
        4. Motor             _____
      2. Sketch the subsystem power voltages displayed by the oscilloscope. If noise was discovered and reduced, sketch the display before and after the noise was reduced.
      3. Calculate the expected operating time for the system. Ensure that the motor power operating lifetime will not exceed the CPU board operating lifetime

Motor System Lifetime _____
CPU Board Lifetime     _____

  1. Let the system run until either the CPU board or the motor stops running. If the CPU board stops before the motor does, increase the capacity of the CPU board power supply.

 

ECET 365 Week 4 Quiz

Instructions

Here is some information about your Quiz.

  • This quiz covers CO 5 and Chapters 4, 11.
  • This quiz is worth 20 total points, which include the following questions:
    • 3 multiple-choice questions at 5 points each;
    • 1 short-answer question at 5 points each; and
  • You have 60 minutes to finish the quiz.
  • Here is a reminder to SAVE frequently, because when the time limit is reached, you will automatically be exited from the exam.
  • This quiz contains one page.

By submitting this work, I am attesting that it abides by the Student Honor Code.

ECET 365 Week 5 Timing and Intterupts DeVry

ECET 365 Week 5 Discussions

WEEK 5: SOFTWARE INTERRUPT COMMANDS

What software commands are used to allow the 9S12 program to receive interrupts?

WEEK 5: POLLING VERSUS INTERRUPTS

For your project, which subsystems should use polling and which should use interrupts?

ECET 365 Week 5 HOMEWORK 

Page 241, Problems 4.1–4.9

Don’t forget to submit your assignment.

 

ECET 365 Week 5 COURSE PROJECT (DUE IN WEEK 8)

Review the Course Project Overview under the Introduction & Resources area for an overall description of the Course Project, grading rubric, and deliverables.

Although this week’s Lab focuses specifically on interrupts, you should use this opportunity to ensure that the software works correctly. This means that you will be loading each of two programs from Appendix A of the Construction Notes for the Robotic Car (Found in the Files section of the Course Menu).

The Lab is focused on tasks required to develop a power supply system for the project.

 

ECET 365 Week 5 Lab

Lab 5: Converting Requirements to a Work Schedule

Objectives

  1. Determine the timing requirements for data to and from subsystems.
  2. Change a procedural subroutine to an interrupt-driven subroutine.
  3. Compare the interrupt-driven system operation to the procedural system.

Parts List

  1. Robotic Car Kit with visual sensor
  2. Freescale Tower Kit with S12G128 CPU board
  3. PC with IDE software (e.g. CodeWarrior Development Studio V5.1)
  4. Alternative Robotics Kit or other kit if applicable
  5. Oscilloscope with X10 probe

Introduction

  1. A system can use many ways to ensure that operations are controlled. A procedural code program can manage the data to and from devices within the main program, or it can use interrupt requests to cause the CPU to jump from the main program to a subroutine.
  2. We will take the code for the Smart Car and modify it to use an interrupt service routine. We will then compare the performance of the two approaches by measuring the period of the SI pulse on the video sensor.

Deliverables

Answer all questions in Week 5 Lab Cover Sheet here (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site..

Submit your Week 5 Lab Assignment.

You can also download the cover sheet for Week 5 Lab in the Files section of the Course Menu.

Required Software

CodeWarrior Development Studio for S12(x) V5.1

Access the software at http://www.nxp.com/ (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site..

Lab Steps

STEP 1: Procedures

  1. Robotic Car Subsystems
    1. The interacting subsystems are the visual sensor subsystem, the steering subsystem, and the CPU board subsystem. We need to ensure that the motor subsystem does not affect the other systems.
    2. Set the assembled car on blocks so that the motor wheels can move freely. Consider that the front wheels must have room to move side to side, and that the back wheels will be powered.
    3. Load the car program into the CPU board. Ensure that the video sensor inputs and outputs are connected to the CPU board. Also, ensure that the servo inputs are correctly connected.
    4. In a previous lab, we have tested the steering with an index card that has a 1-inch-wide stripe down the center of the card. This time, we will test the system with the wheels powered.
    5. Test the system with the subsystems powered, but the motor power to the H-bridges disconnected. Troubleshoot the system if it does not operate satisfactorily. Once the steering system works correctly, proceed to the next step.
    6. Load the CPU with the first program shown in Appendix A of the Construction Notes for the Robotic Car (see the Files section of the Course Menu). If a test track is available, run the Robotic Car program and observe the operation. If a test track is not available, set up the car on a block so that the wheels are free to turn. Use the test index card with the center black stripe. Observe the operation of the car as the stripe is moved left and right.
    7. Load the CPU with the second program shown in Appendix A. Run the program and observe the operation of the Robotic Car as the index card center stripe is moved left and right.
  2. Observations – Complete the following questions in the Week 5 Lab Cover Sheet and submit your Lab Assignment.
    1. Compare the operation of the first program with the operation of the second program.
    2. Explain why the timing has changed.
    3. What changes should be made to the second program to enhance the Robotic Car performance?

ECET 365 Week 5 Quiz

Instructions

Here is some information about your Quiz.

  • This quiz covers CO 6 and Chapter 4.
  • This quiz is worth 20 total points, which include the following questions:
    • 3 multiple-choice questions at 5 points each;
    • 1 short-answer question at 5 points each; and
  • You have 60 minutes to finish the quiz.
  • Here is a reminder to SAVE frequently, because when the time limit is reached, you will automatically be exited from the exam.
  • This quiz contains one page.

By submitting this work, I am attesting that it abides by the Student Honor Code.

ECET 365 Week 6 Interfacing to Networks DeVry

ECET 365 Week 6 Discussions

WEEK 6: NETWORKS AND SERIAL INTERFACES

What is the difference between a network and a serial interface?

WEEK 6: 9S12 BOARD INTERFACES

Which interfaces on the 9S12 are designed for networking?

ECET 365 Week 6 HOMEWORK

Page 710: Problems 14.1–14.4, 14.8–14.13

Don’t forget to submit your assignment.

 

ECET 365 Week 6 COURSE PROJECT (DUE IN WEEK 8)

Review the Course Project Overview under the Introduction & Resources area for an overall description of the Course Project, grading rubric, and deliverables.

The Lab for this week involves locating suitable communications systems on the Internet and comparing them. These could be used on the Robotic Car Project, but they are not required.

 

ECET 365 Week 6 Lab

Lab 6: Interfacing to Networks

Objectives

  1. Compare characteristics of different wireless communications modules.
  2. Compare characteristics of different wireless Internet communications modules.
  3. Determine which modules are the most suitable for the Smart Car or Robotics project.
  4. Develop a preliminary design for connecting a wireless module to the Smart Car or Robotics project.

Parts List

  1. Robotic Car kit with visual sensors
  2. Freescale Tower kit with S12G128 CPU board
  3. PC with IDE software (e.g. CodeWarrior Development Studio V5.1)
  4. PC with Internet access

Introduction

  1. Wireless operation allows you to control your project without being connected with a wiring harness. Your textbook mentions the ZigBee system, but there are many commercial systems available. We will investigate some systems by using the Internet to find and compare systems.
  2. We will also consider systems that provide access to the Internet using wireless communications.
  3. Finally, we will determine which systems are suitable for the Smart Car or Robotics projects.

Deliverables

Answer all questions in Week 6 Lab Cover Sheet here (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site..

Submit your Week 6 Lab Assignment.

You can also download the cover sheet for Week 6 Lab in the Files section of the Course Menu.

Required Software

CodeWarrior Development Studio for S12(x) V5.1

Access the software at http://www.nxp.com/ (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site..

Lab Steps

STEP 1: Procedures

  1. Search the Internet for wireless adaptors that can connect directly to digital ports. The adaptors should consist of a Transmitter section and a Receiver section so that two CPU boards could communicate with each other.
  2. Choose three wireless systems (a ZigBee system can be one of them).
  3. Compare the three systems in terms of
    1. Price;
    2. Ease of implementation (hardware and software);
    3. Data rate;
    4. Security;
    5. Latency; and
  4. After choosing the best system from Step C above, sketch the method you would use to connect it to your project.
  5. As you did for the wireless systems above, find three wireless Internet communication systems, and compare them using the elements of Step C above.
  6. After choosing the best system from Step E above, sketch the method that you would use to connect it to your project.
  7. Observations
    1. Write your observations of the three wireless systems in the table below:
Comparison Item System A System B System C
Price      
Implementation      
Data Rate      
Security      
Latency      
Interference      
       
  1. Sketch how you would connect the chosen system to your project. Attach the sketch to your lab report.
  2. Write your observations of the wireless Internet systems in the table below:
Comparison Item System A System B System C
Price      
Implementation      
Data Rate      
Security      
Latency      
Interference      
       
  1. Attach a sketch showing how you would connect the chosen system to your project.

ECET 365 Week 6 Quiz

Instructions

Here is some information about your Quiz.

  • This quiz covers CO 4 and Chapter 14.
  • This quiz is worth 20 total points, which include the following questions:
    • 3 multiple-choice questions at 5 points each;
    • 1 short-answer question at 5 points each; and
  • You have 60 minutes to finish the quiz.
  • Here is a reminder to SAVE frequently, because when the time limit is reached, you will automatically be exited from the exam.
  • This quiz contains one page.

By submitting this work, I am attesting that it abides by the Student Honor Code.

ECET 365 Week 7 Integration of Subsystems DeVry

ECET 365 Week 7 Discussions

WEEK 7: POSSIBLE ADDITIONAL FEATURES

Now that you are performing the final assembly of your system, what would you add if you had more time?

WEEK 7: POSSIBLE USES FOR THE PROJECT

What are some possible uses of your project? Include possible spinoffs.

ECET 365 Week 7 HOMEWORK

Pages 384–387, Problems 7.1, 7.4, 7.9, 7.13, D7.17

Page 639, Problems 12.1–12.5.

Don’t forget to submit your assignment.

 

ECET 365 Week 7 COURSE PROJECT (DUE IN WEEK 8)

Review the Course Project Overview under the Introduction & Resources area for an overall description of the Course Project, grading rubric, and deliverables.

The Lab this week consists of integrating the various subsystems into a functional Robotic Car. This involves testing and troubleshooting the individual subsystems as well as testing the interaction among the subsystems. Also, a Test Plan is developed to specify the tests that determine that a subsystem is functioning correctly.

The Lab contains an optional step involving a test track. A picture of a suggested test track is available in the Files section of the Course Menu. The track consists of sections of foam board and a center line consisting of black 1-inch wide Gorilla Tape, a duct tape on steroids. Hint: The Robotic Car wheels will need the rubber bands that are included in the kit. Otherwise, the hard plastic wheels will slip on the foam board surface.

 

ECET 365 Week 7 Lab

Lab 7: Integration of Subsystems

Objectives

  1. Complete the assembly of project subsystems.
  2. Test the operation of the completed project.

Parts List

  1. Robotic Car Kit with visual sensors
  2. Freescale Tower Kit with S12G128 CPU board
  3. PC with IDE software (e.g. CodeWarrior Development Studio V5.1)

Introduction

  1. The focus of the previous weeks of this course has been on the building and testing of the various subsystems of the project. This week is devoted to assembling the entire project and testing its operation.
  2. Considerable emphasis will be placed on test procedures that ensure the subsystems interact correctly with each other.

Deliverables

Answer all questions in Week 7 Lab Cover Sheet here (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site..

Submit your Week 7 Lab Assignment.

You can also download the cover sheet for Week 7 Lab in the Files section of the Course Menu.

Required Software

CodeWarrior Development Studio for S12(x) V5.1

Access the software at http://www.nxp.com/ (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site..

Lab Steps

STEP 1: Procedures

  1. The Robotic Car has the following subsystems:
    1. Visual Sensor Subsystem
    2. Steering Subsystem
    3. Driver Motor Subsystem
    4. Computer Subsystem

Test each system above to ensure that each is operating correctly.  Part of this lab’s purpose is to make sure that you have a test for each subsystem. Make any necessary corrections to the subsystems before proceeding to the next step.

  1. Test the operation of the visual sensors, steering subsystem, and computer subsystem, using a white index card with a black 1-inch-wide stripe across the center of the card to ensure that the steering mechanism is following the video input to keep the wheels centered on the stripe. (See Figure 1.) Move the card slowly and observe the motion of the front wheels. Be aware that, if the light environment is too strong, the wheels will jerk very quickly. If the car moves too far from the center line, it may not recover. Try using a light that is less intense. If you can get the wheels to correct as you move the card slowly to the left and right, declare victory and proceed to the next step.
  2. Set the car on a block so that the wheels are not on the ground. Test the drive motor subsystem and computer subsystem to ensure that the motor runs smoothly. You may hear a high frequency due to the pulse frequency. Again, record your test results and correct any hardware or software problems before proceeding to the next step.
  3. (Optional) When the entire system has been assembled and tested, put the car on the test track. (See Appendix A of the “ECET365 Smart Car Contest Rules for one example of a test track, located in the Files section of the Course Menu.) Make sure that the car can go at least two laps around the track.

Observations

Note that each of the subsystems below also uses the computer subsystem to control operations or data. Be sure to include any tests that involve software as well as hardware.

  1. Visual Subsystem
    1. Test Method: (Briefly describe the test method used to verify the correct operation of the visual subsystem.)
    2. Test Results: (Record the measurements that indicate the visual subsystem is operating correctly.)
  2. Steering Subsystem
    1. Test Method: (Briefly describe the test method used to verify the correct operation of the steering subsystem.)
    2. Test Results: (Record the measurements that indicate the steering subsystem is operating correctly.)
  3. Visual sensor and steering operation interaction
    1. Test Method: (Briefly describe the test method used to verify that the visual sensor subsystem and the steering subsystem are working correctly together.)
    2. Test Results: (Record the measurements that indicate the video sensor and steering servo subsystems are working correctly together.
  4. Drive Motor Subsystem
    1. Test Method: (Briefly describe the test method used to verify that the drive motor subsystem is working correctly.)
    2. Test Results: (Record the measurements that indicate the drive motor subsystem is operating correctly).
  5. System Operation
    1. Test Method: (Briefly describe the test method used to verify that the system operates correctly when all the subsystems are operating.)
    2. Test Results: (Record the measurements that indicate the system is operating correctly.)

Additional Questions:

  1. Have your problems been mostly hardware or software? Explain your answer.
  2. How does your estimate of energy required to do two laps compare with your measurements?
  3. What is the pulse frequency of the drive motor control signal?
  4. (Optional) How many laps can the car perform?

ECET 365 Week 8 Presentation of the Project DeVry

ECET 365 Week 8 Discussion

WEEK 8: LOOKING AHEAD

Class, looking back over the Course Objectives for this course, what are you looking forward to learning more about throughout your education and career?

ECET 365 Week 8 COURSE PROJECT: ROBOTIC CAR 

The Robotic Car portion of your Course Project is due this week. See the Course Project Overview under Introduction & Resources area for more specifics.

 

ECET 365 Week 8 COURSE PROJECT: PROJECT MANUAL

The Project Manual portion of your Course Project is due this week. See the Course Project Overview under Introduction & Resources area for more specifics.

 

ECET 365 Week 8 Final Exam

Instructions

Here is some information about your Final Exam.

  • This exam covers COs 1-7 and Chapters 1, 2, 4, 7, 8, 11, 12, and 14.
  • This exam is worth 240 total points, which include the following questions:
    • 17 multiple-choice questions at 10 points each;
    • 7 short-answer question at 10 points each; and
  • You have 3 hours and 30 minutes to finish the exam.
  • Here is a reminder to SAVE frequently, because when the time limit is reached, you will automatically be exited from the exam.
  • This exam has 2 pages. You don’t need to complete them in order

By submitting this work, I am attesting that it abides by the Student Honor Code

 

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