CRMJ 425 DeVry Ethics and Criminal Justice Full Course

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CRMJ 425 DeVry Ethics and Criminal Justice Full Course

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CRMJ 425 DeVry Ethics and Criminal Justice Full Course

CRMJ425

CRMJ 425 DeVry Ethics and Criminal Justice Full Course

CRMJ 425 DeVry Entire Course

CRMJ 425 DeVry Week 1 Discussion 1 Latest

Ethics and Criminal Justice Professionals (graded)

Should criminal justice professionals study ethics? Why – why not?

CRMJ 425 DeVry Week 1 Discussion 2 Latest

Moral Judgments (graded)

Identify and explain the elements that define moral judgments.

 

CRMJ 425 DeVry Week 2 Discussion 1 Latest

Evaluate Theories of Moral Development (graded)

Evaluate theories of moral development in terms of their importance of resolving moral dilemmas.

 

CRMJ 425 DeVry Week 2 Discussion 2 Latest

Analyze the Differences of Law & Justice (graded)

Analyze the differences between law and justice.

 

CRMJ 425 DeVry Week 3 Discussion 1 Latest

Paradigms of Law (graded)

There are three major legal paradigms. Let’s first compare the consensus and conflict paradigms: what are the major differences between the two?

 

CRMJ 425 DeVry Week 3 Discussion 2 Latest

Ideologies & Policy Making (graded)

There are two major ideologies that guide criminal justice policy making. What are the major differences between them as they related to criminal justice?

 

CRMJ 425 DeVry Week 4 Discussion 1 Latest

Elements of Law Enforcement Power (graded)

For our first topic let’s focus the discussing of the elements of law enforcement power. What are they? Provide an example of each one that you mention.

 

CRMJ 425 DeVry Week 4 Discussion 2 Latest

Types of Law Enforcement Corruption (graded)

Our second topic will focus on types of law enforcement corruption. List, analyze, and discuss them.

 

CRMJ 425 DeVry Week 5 Discussion 1 Latest

Discuss Prosecutorial Interest Conflicts (graded)

Discuss the major issues concerning prosecutorial conflicts of interest.

 

CRMJ 425 DeVry Week 5 Discussion 2 Latest

Adversarial Relationships: DA v. Defense (graded)

Discuss the adversarial relationships between the defense attorney and the prosecutor in the adjudication process.

 

CRMJ 425 DeVry Week 6 Discussion 1 Latest

Institutional & Community Corrections (graded)

Institution and community corrections are the primary methods used in America; describe and discuss the related ethical issues in these systems.

 

CRMJ 425 DeVry Week 6 Discussion 2 Latest

Rationales for Punishment (graded)

There are several rationales for punishment, all of them are legitimated by social contract theory. What are the major differences between retribution and prevention as forms of punishment?

 

CRMJ 425 DeVry Week 7 Discussion 1 Latest

Discuss Noble Cause Corruption (graded)

Discuss the reasons for noble cause corruption.

 

CRMJ 425 DeVry Week 7 Discussion 2 Latest

Crime Control & the War on Terror (graded)

Discuss what you believe are the major ethical issues in crime control and the war on terror.

 

 

CRMJ 425 DeVry Week 1 Assignment Latest

Website Field Trip

Website Field Trip #1

Details:

Review and study this site; http://www.theiacp.org/ and find the section on ethics, write a short report on your findings and answer the following questions:

  1. Who sponsors this site?
  2. What is the purpose of this site?
  3. How does this site relate to CJ and ethics and this course?
  4. What are some of the new and interesting facts that you learned from this site?
  5. Does this site have anything for CJ students?

Submit your findings by using the drop box.

 

 

CRMJ 425 DeVry Week 2 Assignment Latest

Ethical Dilemma

Details:

Ethical Dilemma Exercise Instructions

Using the information in chapter two and week two’s lecture solve this week’s ethical dilemmas exer-cise using the following format:

Ethical Judgment:

Here you state the judgment you have made about the ethical dilemma; that is you state the action you deem the best action to take in this case.

For example:

Tell the prosecutor and if the prosecutor keeps the information from the defense attorney, you should provide it.

Moral Rules:

Here you list the rules that apply to support the judgment you have made.

For example:

One should seek justice.

One should protect due process.

One should do one’s duty.

One should not lie.

One should strive to protect the innocent.

Ethical System:

Here you list the system(s) that would support your judgment. Perhaps a paradigm to follow is to work through the systems and first list the ones that would not support your judgment.

For example:

Ethical formalism would define a law enforcement officer’s duty as not just telling the truth on the stand, but to seek justice (same for the prosecutor). It makes no different whether the officer thought the defendant was guilty or not (except for egoism and act-utilitarianism). One of the principles of due process and our system of advocacy is that the defense attorney has a right of access to exculpatory information – the prosecutor is both legally and ethically bound to provide such information to the defense. The police officer, as a participant in the justice process, has a complementary duty.

This is the format you need to follow when solving the assigned ethical dilemmas, if you have ques-tions ask your instructor.

 

 

CRMJ 425 DeVry Week 3 Assignment Latest

Ethical Dilemma

Details:

Ethical Dilemma Exercise Instructions

Using the information in chapter two and week two’s lecture solve this week’s ethical dilemmas exer-cise using the following format:

Ethical Judgment:

Here you state the judgment you have made about the ethical dilemma; that is you state the action you deem the best action to take in this case.

For example:

Tell the prosecutor and if the prosecutor keeps the information from the defense attorney, you should provide it.

Moral Rules:

Here you list the rules that apply to support the judgment you have made.

For example:

One should seek justice.

One should protect due process.

One should do one’s duty.

One should not lie.

One should strive to protect the innocent.

Ethical System:

Here you list the system(s) that would support your judgment. Perhaps a paradigm to follow is to work through the systems and first list the ones that would not support your judgment.

For example:

Ethical formalism would define a law enforcement officer’s duty as not just telling the truth on the stand, but to seek justice (same for the prosecutor). It makes no different whether the officer thought the defendant was guilty or not (except for egoism and act-utilitarianism). One of the principles of due process and our system of advocacy is that the defense attorney has a right of access to exculpatory information – the prosecutor is both legally and ethically bound to provide such information to the defense. The police officer, as a participant in the justice process, has a complementary duty.

This is the format you need to follow when solving the assigned ethical dilemmas, if you have ques-tions ask your instructor.

 

 

CRMJ 425 DeVry Week 5 Assignment Latest

Ethical Dilemma

Details:

Ethical Dilemma Exercise Instructions

Using the information in chapter two and week two’s lecture solve this week’s ethical dilemmas exer-cise using the following format:

Ethical Judgment:

Here you state the judgment you have made about the ethical dilemma; that is you state the action you deem the best action to take in this case.

For example:

Tell the prosecutor and if the prosecutor keeps the information from the defense attorney, you should provide it.

Moral Rules:

Here you list the rules that apply to support the judgment you have made.

For example:

One should seek justice.

One should protect due process.

One should do one’s duty.

One should not lie.

One should strive to protect the innocent.

Ethical System:

Here you list the system(s) that would support your judgment. Perhaps a paradigm to follow is to work through the systems and first list the ones that would not support your judgment.

For example:

Ethical formalism would define a law enforcement officer’s duty as not just telling the truth on the stand, but to seek justice (same for the prosecutor). It makes no different whether the officer thought the defendant was guilty or not (except for egoism and act-utilitarianism). One of the principles of due process and our system of advocacy is that the defense attorney has a right of access to exculpatory information – the prosecutor is both legally and ethically bound to provide such information to the defense. The police officer, as a participant in the justice process, has a complementary duty.

This is the format you need to follow when solving the assigned ethical dilemmas, if you have ques-tions ask your instructor.

 

 

CRMJ 425 DeVry Week 6 Assignment Latest

Ethical Dilemma

Details:

Ethical Dilemma Exercise Instructions

Using the information in chapter two and week two’s lecture solve this week’s ethical dilemmas exer-cise using the following format:

Ethical Judgment:

Here you state the judgment you have made about the ethical dilemma; that is you state the action you deem the best action to take in this case.

For example:

Tell the prosecutor and if the prosecutor keeps the information from the defense attorney, you should provide it.

Moral Rules:

Here you list the rules that apply to support the judgment you have made.

For example:

One should seek justice.

One should protect due process.

One should do one’s duty.

One should not lie.

One should strive to protect the innocent.

Ethical System:

Here you list the system(s) that would support your judgment. Perhaps a paradigm to follow is to work through the systems and first list the ones that would not support your judgment.

For example:

Ethical formalism would define a law enforcement officer’s duty as not just telling the truth on the stand, but to seek justice (same for the prosecutor). It makes no different whether the officer thought the defendant was guilty or not (except for egoism and act-utilitarianism). One of the principles of due process and our system of advocacy is that the defense attorney has a right of access to exculpatory information – the prosecutor is both legally and ethically bound to provide such information to the defense. The police officer, as a participant in the justice process, has a complementary duty.

This is the format you need to follow when solving the assigned ethical dilemmas, if you have ques-tions ask your instructor.

 

 

CRMJ 425 DeVry Week 6 Assignment 2 Latest

Website Field Trip 2

Website Field Trip #2

Details:

Review and study this site; www.abanet.org and find the section on ethics, write a short report on your findings and answer the following questions:

  1. Who sponsors this site?
  2. What is the purpose of this site?
  3. How does this site relate to CJ and ethics and this course?
  4. What are some of the new and interesting facts that you learned from this site?
  5. Does this site have anything for CJ students?

Submit your findings by using the drop box.

 

 

CRMJ 425 DeVry Week 7 Assignment Latest

Ethical Dilemma

Details:

Ethical Dilemma Exercise Instructions

Using the information in chapter two and week two’s lecture solve this week’s ethical dilemmas exer-cise using the following format:

Ethical Judgment:

Here you state the judgment you have made about the ethical dilemma; that is you state the action you deem the best action to take in this case.

For example:

Tell the prosecutor and if the prosecutor keeps the information from the defense attorney, you should provide it.

Moral Rules:

Here you list the rules that apply to support the judgment you have made.

For example:

One should seek justice.

One should protect due process.

One should do one’s duty.

One should not lie.

One should strive to protect the innocent.

Ethical System:

Here you list the system(s) that would support your judgment. Perhaps a paradigm to follow is to work through the systems and first list the ones that would not support your judgment.

For example:

Ethical formalism would define a law enforcement officer’s duty as not just telling the truth on the stand, but to seek justice (same for the prosecutor). It makes no different whether the officer thought the defendant was guilty or not (except for egoism and act-utilitarianism). One of the principles of due process and our system of advocacy is that the defense attorney has a right of access to exculpatory information – the prosecutor is both legally and ethically bound to provide such information to the defense. The police officer, as a participant in the justice process, has a complementary duty.

This is the format you need to follow when solving the assigned ethical dilemmas, if you have ques-tions ask your instructor.

 

 

CRMJ 425 DeVry Week 4 Midterm Exam Latest

Question 3: TCO#1: The primary difference between act and rule utilitarianism is:

  • Act utilitarianism determines the utility of each moral decision one by one, while rule utilitarianism does not.
  • Rule utilitarianism determines the utility of each moral decision one by one, while act utilitarianism does not.
  • Rule utilitarianism focuses on the character of the decision-maker, while act utilitarianism does not.
  • Act utilitarianism focuses on the long-term consequences of an act, while rule utilitarianism does not.

Question 9: TCO#1: Ethical work decisions fall into three of the following categories; which one does not belong?

  • Effects on citizenry
  • Effects on self
  • Effects on other employees
  • Effects on organizations

Question 10: TCO#1: The primary distinction between religious ethics and natural law is:

  • That natural law demands that animals be considered part of the moral universe, while religious ethics does not.
  • Religious ethics does not recognize an external source of morality while natural law does not.
  • Natural law does not recognize an external source of morality while religious ethics does not.
  • Natural law refers to no specific supernatural figures as the source of morality, while religious ethics does.

Question 15: TCO#1: The subcultural ethics of police are most consistent with what ethical system?

  • Ethics of virtue
  • Ethical Formalism
  • Utilitarianism
  • Natural Law